North Alabama woman warns about cancer screening scam

North Alabama woman warns about cancer screening scam

SCOTTSBORO, Ala. (WAFF) - You’ve probably heard the saying “if it sounds to good to be true, it probably is.” That’s what ran through the mind of a woman in Scottsboro who received a call asking if she wanted a free test showing her risk for cancer.

According to the AARP, people in several states have been scammed by what sounds like an innocent phone call, but what’s promised to be delivered is indeed too good to be true.

“They called me yesterday and wanted to send me a kit for a cancer screening and they told me they’d tell me if I was going to have cancer or if my children would have cancer because it’s genetic,” said Leona Frank.

Like every parent who loves their child, Frank was intrigued with the free offer.

“They said Medicaid or Medicare would pay for it. I called Medicare and Medicaid both and they said they would not pay for it. It was a scam," she said.

Frank’s son did some research and has some advice for you to follow, especially if you take care of one of your parents.

“You just got to be vigilant, be careful. With the Capital One breach on the password, all that, mom is one of them as well, so I guess she’s twice as likely for that to happen," said Michael Frank. “My dad is no longer here, so I’m here to help her and watch over her and make sure it doesn’t happen to other people.”

The people who the Franks say tried to scam them knew all of her information, including her name, address, phone number and insurance company. They don’t know for sure how they got their information, but they want to make sure you don’t accept anything from a caller, including a cancer screening test.

A Medicare spokesperson said in part: “We urge Medicare beneficiaries to contact their physicians and do not submit to testing without a doctor order. We also encourage beneficiaries to report frauds to 1-800-Medicare.”

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