Private accident reconstruction team heads to Huntsville for bus crash - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Private accident reconstruction team heads to Huntsville for bus crash

A private accident reconstruction team from Colorado will soon be in Huntsville to dissect and survey the Lee High School bus crash that killed 4 students and hurt 40.     

 The bus flipped off the on-ramp to Interstate 565 on November 20th and landed on its nose more than 30 feet below.       

Ponderosa Associates have handled a number of high profile cases over the years. 

They were involved in the Ford Explorer rollover cases and the Firestone and Bridgestone tire cases years ago, but never a case of this magnitude that has received as much media attention involving school students and the potential to influence bus safety issues locally and nationally.

Eight weeks ago, a fatal school bus crash, a closed overpass and a team of investigators pieced together a tragedy.

In less than two weeks the overpass will be shut down again, but for a different investigation, a reconstruction of the accident. 

It's already known where the bus hit the concrete barrier and where the bus went over the guardrail, but how fast was the Celica driving?

How fast was the bus going?

Were there any failed components to either vehicle?

Questions yet to be answered that will ultimately answer the question, "What caused the Laidlaw bus to come over the guardrail and nosedive more than 30 feet into the ground?"

Attorney Mark McDaniel says it's imperative those findings come sooner than later.

He represents 18 victims of that crash, and has hired a forensic engineering firm to do an investigation separate from the local, state, and national investigations underway.

Ponderosa Associates Mike McCort says his team will develop a scene diagram of the overpass, the vehicles and the evidence.

"We'll begin the reconstruction process matching evidence on the vehicles, evidence on the road, and diagramming that out and apply specifics to figure out speeds and so forth," McCort said.

McCort says the physical reconstruction will take a few weeks and will get basic answers for this case. 

They will likely be asked to develop an animation of the accident, which could take much longer.

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