Supreme Court asked to leave in place DACA document order - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Supreme Court asked to leave in place DACA document order

WASHINGTON (AP) - Several states and others suing over the Trump administration's decision to end a program protecting young immigrants from deportation asked the Supreme Court on Wednesday to leave in place a judge's order requiring the government to disclose documents.

Attorneys for the U.S. Department of Justice last week told the high court that the order by U.S. District Court Judge William Alsup in San Francisco was too broad and would require the administration to turn over protected and nonpublic documents.

States, the University of California and others are suing over the administration's decision to end the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, called DACA. The states said in a Supreme Court filing that "the public is entitled to know on what basis" the government "made this decision." The program is scheduled to end on March 5, 2018.

A federal appeals court last month upheld the judge's order, which requires the government to disclose all emails, letters and other documents it considered in its decision to end DACA. The administration had previously only turned over 256 pages of documents, all of which were already publicly available.

The judge himself, who was nominated by President Bill Clinton, also filed a several-page statement with the Supreme Court on Wednesday. In it, he told the court that the government's filings leave "the incorrect impression" that he "endorsed unfettered" production of documents and other information by the government.

The government has been ordered to produce the additional documents by Dec. 22.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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