Spring gardening tips - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Spring gardening tips

(WAFF) -

Spring has officially arrived any many of you are ready to start planting your flowers and vegetables! The Tennessee Valley has had a relatively mild winter, which has prompted many people to start their gardening a little earlier than usual. The days are getting longer and the abundance of sunshine is fueling the urge to start sprucing up yards now. The threat of frost is nearing its end; typically the first of April is the average for our area. So, we have a few tips from Bennett Nurseries on what is safe to plant and how to protect what you may have already planted.

George Bennett, President of Bennett Nurseries, says, "There are a lot of things that might be killed if there was a frost and it's likely there might be one. But all it takes is, like a plant in the ground that you keep a cardboard box with. You just flip it up and over and make a canopy over the plant that you've put in the ground. It's good down to maybe 25 degrees that way."

Cool season vegetables, like lettuce, collards, and arugula can be planted now without any problems. However, plants like tomatoes, peppers and okra don't gain anything to be planted early, so you should wait until late April or early May before putting them in the ground.

Bennett also recommends that you look for plants that are displayed outdoors, not in the greenhouse, but those that are out in the open to plant now.

"We grow about 500 different types of perennials. Now is the best time to go and choose what you want and plant it later. There's about 150 different varieties of annuals in one greenhouse alone and  25 to 28,000 plants being groomed and waiting until the threat of frost has passed," said Bennett.

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