Athens State students learn biology up close with Lady Abra Cada - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Athens State students learn biology up close with Lady Abra Cadaver

(Source: WAFF) (Source: WAFF)
ATHENS, AL (WAFF) -

Let us introduce you to Lady Abra Cadaver. She is a SynDaver or synthetic cadaver. Athens State University is the only school in the state to have one.

Lady Abra Cadaver is so realistic and so much a better teaching tool than a very hard plastic version of an ear or even trying to learn from a text book. Biology professor Chris Otto explains what makes this so special.

"The material is life like so you can do suturing with it for example. It's very realistic," Otto said.

He said smaller samples are also provided for the touch. And it's not just the look but the feel of arteries, muscles and organs. That's why it has to stay wet.

And everything is mapped out. She's got her arteries in red, which is an international code for this sort of thing. Veins are blue and the nerves are yellow.

Otto said the SynDaver is a 5 foot 4 inch tall female with an estimated weight of about 120 pounds. She's very similar to a similarly built human, but maybe a little heavier.

After 30 proposed names they settled on "Lady Abra Cadaver." While there is not a lot of magic here, Otto says there is a lot of color-coded science.

The person responsible for bringing the SynDaver here is assistant biology professor Sara Cline, She said she was doing a Google search when, much to her surprise, she ran across a contest. In order to win this valuable prize, she had to submit a paper detailing what she would do with it.

"So I said we were going to use it with our students in the classroom during the fall," she said.

Lady Abra Cadaver will be attending schools through the Science in Motion Program so that other, younger students will have an opportunity to study this anatomy.

"I grew up in a county school in Kentucky, and I'm aware that sometimes county schools don't exactly have the resources that inner city schools might have," said Cline.

And who knows. Maybe a future physician or scientist could be in the class.

Copyright 2016 WAFF. All rights reserved.

Report an Error | Submit a Tip to WAFF 48

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Mom who went to classes with quadriplegic son gets MBA

    Mom who went to classes with quadriplegic son gets MBA

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 3:27 AM EDT2017-05-24 07:27:51 GMT
    Wednesday, May 24 2017 3:32 AM EDT2017-05-24 07:32:22 GMT
    A Southern California university has granted a surprise honorary degree to the mother of a quadriplegic student after she attended every class and took notes for him while he earned his MBA.More >>
    A Southern California university has granted a surprise honorary degree to the mother of a quadriplegic student after she attended every class and took notes for him while he earned his MBA.More >>
  • Pregnant teen blocked from walking at graduation

    Pregnant teen blocked from walking at graduation

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 2:45 AM EDT2017-05-24 06:45:22 GMT
    Wednesday, May 24 2017 2:45 AM EDT2017-05-24 06:45:22 GMT

    The school principal says the student and her parents signed a covenant, vowing the teen wouldn’t have sex.

    More >>

    The school principal says the student and her parents signed a covenant, vowing the teen wouldn’t have sex.

    More >>
  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly