New CDC study finds therapy just as effective as medication in A - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

New CDC study finds therapy just as effective as medication in ADHD cases

A new study shows that behavior therapy in patients with ADHD can be as effective as medicine but without the side effects. (Source: WAFF) A new study shows that behavior therapy in patients with ADHD can be as effective as medicine but without the side effects. (Source: WAFF)
DECATUR, AL (WAFF) -

Del McElroy is the clinical director at Eagle Consulting. He's read about a study released by the Centers for Disease Control which pushes behavior modification therapy rather than drugs for ADHD treatment.

The study indicates the behavior therapy can be as effective as medicine but without the side effects. McElroy said he agrees with their findings.

"Between the ages of 2 to 5 years, there's a lot of brain development going on at that time."

Much of the training, he said, begins at home.

"And so being able to create an atmosphere in the home of structure and activity for the kids, gets them physically active which stimulates growth and development."

If done correctly, McElroy said parents have a good chance of significantly impacting a child's ability to manage their own attention and behavior. He said stability and security for the child is important, especially during the beginning stages of neurological development.

"They have to be taught," said McElroy. "They have to be trained."

He maintains unnecessary labels can be detrimental.

"When there's a label put there, there can be a lot of excuses made and people trying to identify blame when good effective training and positive parenting can help correct a lot of behaviors."

McElroy said it can build a child's self-esteem and confidence. Unfortunately if the child receives a lot of attention for negative behavior, that attention can bring about more bad behavior. He said to make certain you praise good behavior and when praise is given, be specific.

While most families are busy, McElroy suggests taking the time to focus on the child and their behavior and learn what can add to attention problems.

"I've never understood a reason for a television in a child's room," said McElroy. "What's the purpose of it? The difficulty and the decrease in physical education in the schools and so you transfer that also to home and kids not getting that physical activity because physical activity aids in growth and development."

He says it important for parents to educate themselves about childhood development and expectations at certain ages.  But at the same time know that every child is different.

For more information on Del McElroy and Eagle Consulting Counseling Division, please click here.

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