AL Chief Justice Roy Moore: 'Christians are going to be persecut - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

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AL Chief Justice Roy Moore: 'Christians are going to be persecuted'

Source: WBRC video Source: WBRC video
Source: WBRC video Source: WBRC video
KIMBERLY, AL (WBRC) -

“Christians are going to be persecuted.”

That's what Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore told a church in Kimberly on Sunday, June 28. Moore has been an outspoken opponent of same-sex marriage.

In February, he ordered probate judges not to give marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Now Moore is saying he believes the high court has blurred the lines between church and state.

"Is there such a thing as morality anymore?" Moore asked from the pulpit on Sunday morning.

"Welcome to the new world. It just changed for you Christians. It's a time where you're going to be persecuted, according the United States Supreme Court dissent," Moore told the congregation.

Speaking at the Kimberly Church of God, Moore used the words of the four justices who went against the ruling as his basis for his remarks.

But it should also be noted that the five justices that made up the majority opinion said the First Amendment will provide protection to religious organizations and persons.

"Those who adhere to religious doctrines, may continue to advocate with the utmost, sincere conviction that, by divine precepts, same-sex marriage should not be condoned," the Court opinion says.

"No one's religious freedom is being infringed upon by this particular ruling," former federal judge and current Samford law professor John Carroll said.

On Friday, Carroll said that for at least right now, those in the religious community and even those in the private sector need not worry about their beliefs being violated.

"Does this mean that caterers have to cater same-sex marriage? Does this mean ministers have to preside over same-sex marriages? And the answer is absolutely not. This law does not say anything about that," Caroll explained.

If a state were to pass a law where a person maybe could not refuse services to a same-sex wedding, that's when you would run into tension between religious freedom and this ruling.

In Alabama, at least, no such laws exist.

Copyright 2015 WBRC. All rights reserved.

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