'No reason' for some women's health care laws, says male senator - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

'No reason' for some women's health care laws, says male senator

Senator and Doctor Larry Stutts does not believe physicians should notify women in writing if they have dense breast tissue or that they are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer. (Source: WAFF) Senator and Doctor Larry Stutts does not believe physicians should notify women in writing if they have dense breast tissue or that they are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer. (Source: WAFF)
HUNTSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

A group of Alabama senators are proposing big changes to the laws surrounding women's health issues.

Senator and Doctor Larry Stutts does not believe physicians should notify women in writing if they have dense breast tissue or that they are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer. 

Stutts also does not think women need to stay in the hospital for a minimum of 48 hours after giving birth. 

Right now, if doctors find a patient has dense breast tissue after conducting a mammogram, the doctor is required to send a letter to the patient. The letter must notify the patient they have dense breast tissue and that they are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer. 

Senator Stutts wants to do away with that requirement. 

“It's something I deal with on a daily basis,” Stutts said. “The days that I'm in the office, I probably average sending 10 people for mammogram's, so I am very familiar with the follow up of mammogram's, very familiar with what should be done." 

Senator Stutts also wants to repeal the current law that requires insurance maternity coverage provide a minimum hospital stay of 48 hours for a vaginal delivery, and 96 hours for a cesarean section. 

“There's no reason it should be mandated,” Stutts said. “If you have knee surgery, do you think there should be a law for how long you stay in the hospital after knee surgery?” 

The senator added the patient and doctor should decide when the patient is ready to leave, a time that could be earlier or later than 48 hours depending on the delivery. 

READ MORE: Full bill (PDF)

Several other Alabama senators are backing this bill, and all of them have gotten significant funding from the Medical Association of the State of Alabama. 

The MASA has spent more than $175,000 on the six senators backing this bill. The medical association has made campaign contributions ranging from $5,000 for Senator Bill Hightower, to more than $80,000 for Senator J.T. Waggoner. 

We reached out to the Medical Association to see where they stand on this bill, but they have yet to respond. 

Senator Larry Stutts says the bill is about getting rid of mandates and "emotional legislation that doesn't improve care." 

“I am 100 percent for women's health care, 100 percent for mammogram's, 100 percent for people staying in the hospital as long as they need to stay... but it's not something that should be legislative,” Stutts said.

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