Cursive bill would ensure handwriting classes stay in schools - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Cursive bill would ensure handwriting classes stay in schools

Cursive handwriting is still taught in schools, but the bill would ensure it stays in the curriculum. (Source: WAFF) Cursive handwriting is still taught in schools, but the bill would ensure it stays in the curriculum. (Source: WAFF)
HUNTSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

An Alabama state representative wants to require cursive writing be taught to students by third grade.

Representative Dickie Drake has pre-filed a bill to do just that, after he was contacted by a concerned mother whose teenage son couldn't read a letter written in cursive.

When the state adopted common core standards back in 2010, they had a choice to keep teaching cursive handwriting, and it is in the state curriculum for second and third graders until at least the 2016-2017 school year.

An Alabama Department of Education spokesperson says there are no plans to phase it out, but Representative Drake's bill would make sure it never went away.

Drake's legislation calls for students to be able to create readable documents through legible cursive handwriting by the end of the third grade.

Drake says cursive writing is a lost art and it's something he doesn't want to see go away.

The state representative says he's tried to put this legislation together for three years and doesn't think there's any opposition to it this session.

"I'm looking in the future, and I know they're probably going to say 'everything is going to be electronically signed,' but in my opinion when these kids grow up, how are they going to sign legal documents? 'Your x looks just like my x.' The signature identifies the person," Drake explained.

Drake isn't the only one trying to preserve the cursive writing style.

Both Tennessee and North Carolina legislators passed similar laws in the last two years.

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