Texas mom invents an app kids can't ignore - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Texas mom invents an app kids can't ignore

App shuts down phone until a parent is contacted for a password. (Photo source: KTRK) App shuts down phone until a parent is contacted for a password. (Photo source: KTRK)
(Photo source: KTRK) (Photo source: KTRK)
Frustrated by lack of response from her teenagers, mom creates an app that guarantees a response. (Photo source: KTRK) Frustrated by lack of response from her teenagers, mom creates an app that guarantees a response. (Photo source: KTRK)
HOUSTON (KTRK) - A Texas mom created an app that shut downs the phone until the teen communicates with his/her parents. The mother was livid the day she called and texted her teenage children and they didn't respond. Once she knew they were safe, but ignoring her calls, she got the idea for the app.

"We need to develop an app that just shuts their phone completely down and they can't even use it," said Sharon Standifird, creator of the 'Ignore No More' app. "I started started researching how to develop an app."

Her husband William says he wasn't surprised.

"Anything she's ever really set her mind to, she's done," said Standifird's husband.

After serving in the Gulf War, patrolling as military police and even climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, becoming an app developer was just one more challenge for this mom on a mission.

After months of design and working with developers, 'Ignore No More' was born.

Standifird says, "As a parent, all I have to do is touch the app, tap his name. To lock Bradley's device, enter at least a four-digit unlock code. Now I'm going to press 'lock Bradley's phone.' If you watch Bradley's phone, it's going to go blank. Bradley needs to call me because I'm the person that has the unlock password."

With one tap, a list of only parent-selected contacts comes up. The child can call, get the password and unlock the phone.

"It takes away texting, it takes away the gaming, it takes away calling their friends. The child will always be able to call 911," Standifird says.

So, how does her son feel about the idea?

"Well I thought it was a good idea, but for other people, not me," said Standifird's son.

"I do have to say that he responds to my texts and my calls a whole lot quicker than he used to," Standifird says.

The 'Ignore No More' app is only available for Android phones on the Google Play store for $1.99.

Copyright 2014 KTRK via CNN. All rights reserved.
  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Bush's Baked Beans announces voluntary recall

    Bush's Baked Beans announces voluntary recall

    Sunday, July 23 2017 7:14 PM EDT2017-07-23 23:14:18 GMT
    Sunday, July 23 2017 7:14 PM EDT2017-07-23 23:14:18 GMT

    Bush Brothers & Co.Saturday announced a voluntary recall of certain 28-ounce cans of three varieties of its baked beans.  

    More >>

    Bush Brothers & Co.Saturday announced a voluntary recall of certain 28-ounce cans of three varieties of its baked beans.  

    More >>
  • Police: Parents gave newborn drugs to cover up addiction

    Police: Parents gave newborn drugs to cover up addiction

    Sunday, July 23 2017 1:52 AM EDT2017-07-23 05:52:55 GMT
    Sunday, July 23 2017 1:52 AM EDT2017-07-23 05:52:55 GMT
    Colby Wilde, 29, and Lacey Christenson, 26, face four counts each of child endangerment and felony drug charges. (Source: Utah County Sherriff’s Office/KUTV/CNN)Colby Wilde, 29, and Lacey Christenson, 26, face four counts each of child endangerment and felony drug charges. (Source: Utah County Sherriff’s Office/KUTV/CNN)

    The baby’s mother used heroin and prescription pain medication during her pregnancy, and the baby was born addicted to drugs, police say.

    More >>

    The baby’s mother used heroin and prescription pain medication during her pregnancy, and the baby was born addicted to drugs, police say.

    More >>
  • New York Times asks 'Fox & Friends' for apology

    New York Times asks 'Fox & Friends' for apology

    Sunday, July 23 2017 8:11 PM EDT2017-07-24 00:11:08 GMT
    Monday, July 24 2017 12:51 AM EDT2017-07-24 04:51:38 GMT
    The New York Times is asking Fox News' morning show "Fox & Friends" to apologize for what the newspaper calls a "malicious and inaccurate segment" about intelligence leaks and the Islamic State that aired Saturday.More >>
    The New York Times is asking Fox News' morning show "Fox & Friends" to apologize for what the newspaper calls a "malicious and inaccurate segment" about intelligence leaks and the Islamic State that aired Saturday.More >>
Powered by Frankly