New program at Shoals hospital brings ER to the patient - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

New program at Shoals hospital brings ER to the patient

The truck comes with additional capabilities to serve as a mobile command center in disaster situations. (Source: WAFF) The truck comes with additional capabilities to serve as a mobile command center in disaster situations. (Source: WAFF)
FLORENCE, AL (WAFF) -

ECM and Shoals Ambulance have partnered to take patient care to the next level.

With the purchase of a new state-of-the art Critical Care Truck, they created the Critical Care Program. The truck is designed like an ambulance, only with more room and more capabilities allowing crews to provide better and consistent care for critical patients during transport. There will be specific teams scheduled to the truck which will include a critical care paramedic, an RN, and respiratory therapist.

“Not only do we take those specialized skills with us in the back of the truck, we carry other equipment that's normally not provided on a ground ambulance,” said ER Director at ECM Hospital Kevin Bowling. “We'll have capabilities to do rapid sequence intubations, we will have the ability to put patients on a ventilator to better manage their ventilation status between the outlying facility and us. It really is taking the ER and the hospital to the patient opposed to just bringing the patient to the ER.”

The truck comes with additional capabilities to serve as a mobile command center in disaster situations.

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