Moulton residents learn more about Carly's Law - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Moulton residents learn more about Carly's Law

Carly's Law allows children with rare disorders to have access to a marijuana-derived oil called CBD. (Source: WAFF) Carly's Law allows children with rare disorders to have access to a marijuana-derived oil called CBD. (Source: WAFF)
MOULTON, AL (WAFF) -

Dozens of people met Monday night to learn more about a law concerning a medicine derived from a strain of marijuana.

A forum took place at Mel's Family Steak House in Moulton, where people had an opportunity to ask questions about Carly's Law.

The law, named after Carly Chandler, went into effect June 1. It allows children with rare disorders to have access to a marijuana-derived oil called CBD. The extract comes from a strain of the plant that does not produce a "high."

Carly's father was one of the forum's guest speakers.

"Marijuana is a stigmatized word; a stigmatized plant," said Dustin Chandler. "The 'm-word,' as we call it, sometimes scares people away, and that's why education was a big part of this upfront, to educate people that this was a high-CBD and low-THC-content oil that has been antidotally-proven to help people with seizures."

Chandler said he pushed for the bill not only to help his daughter, but to help other Alabamians.

Copyright 2014 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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