See, Click, Fix: Lee Drive garbage - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

See, Click, Fix: Lee Drive garbage

Huntsville's Green Team checked on a pile of trash and debris. (Source: WAFF) Huntsville's Green Team checked on a pile of trash and debris. (Source: WAFF)
HUNTSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

There are chairs and mattresses, and it's hard to tell what the rest of the pile contains. Together, it's just a heck of a lot of trash left on the side of Lee Drive in Huntsville. Someone left it there to be picked up and it was reported on our See, Click, Fix site on June 30. 

Give the city credit. Huntsville's Green Team got it first, then sent it to the sanitation department. We checked it out. A crew went out and hauled it all away. According to the See, Click, Fix site, that was on July 3.

Now, to more traffic signal inquiries. One has to do with the signal at University Drive and Old Monrovia. The issue's apparently overnight, in this case 4:30 a.m. The woman posting it said the light goes through a full cycle including turn arrows even if there are only cars eastbound on University. Huntsville traffic engineers are now checking it to see if adjustments are needed.

There's a similar problem at Bonnell Drive and Sparkman. Someone posted it, saying it can take up to ten minutes for the light to change and that encourages some drivers to go through the office complex parking lot as a short cut to make a left turn onto Sparkman. 

Engineers already checked this out. They say the Bonnell/Sparkman light is coordinated with the one at Laurelwood and Sparkman, and the cycle length is two minutes. But they'll check back to see if it's taking longer.

Copyright 2014 WAFF. All rights reserved.
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