Tennessee's first West Nile virus case involves Shelby Co. - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Tennessee's first West Nile virus case involves Shelby Co. resident

Posted: Updated:
(Source: WMC Action News 5 file footage) (Source: WMC Action News 5 file footage)
MEMPHIS, TN -

(WMC) - Tennessee Department of Health confirms the state's first confirmed case of West Nile virus involves a Shelby County resident, who is now recovering.

With one West Nile virus case confirmed so far this year, the mosquito season will remain at its peak until October. In 2013, Tennessee had 24 human cases of West Nile virus; three people died as a result.

Because there is no vaccine for West Nile virus, people are encouraged to take preventative measures to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.

The following tips supplied by Tennessee Department of Health could reduce your risk of getting the West Nile virus:

* Use insect repellants such as DEET, Picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR3535 on your skin, following all label recommendations for usage. Pay particular attention to recommendations for use on children and never apply any of these products around the mouth or eyes at any age. Consult your health care provider if you have questions.

* Certain products containing permethrin are recommended for use on clothing, shoes, bed nets and camping gear. Permethrin-treated clothing repels and kills mosquitoes and other pests and retains this effect after repeated laundering. Permethrin is not to be used directly on skin.

* Do not use perfume, cologne or other scented products such as deodorant, soap or lotion if you're going outside, as fragrances may attract mosquitoes.

* Remember "long, loose and light" when choosing clothes to wear outdoors. Long-sleeved shirts and long pants are best, and for more protection, tuck pants into your socks and your shirt into your pants to form bug barriers. Wear loose-fitting clothing to prevent bites through the fabric. Light-colored clothes are less attractive to many insects and may allow you to spot them more easily.

* Eliminate standing water near your home, which can serve as a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Many containers, even those as small as a bottle cap, can hold enough water for mosquitoes to breed.

* Keep wading pools empty when not in use and store them on their sides. Replace water in bird baths weekly and don't allow water to stand in buckets or barrels. If you have a rain collection barrel, make sure it has a tight-fitting screen on the top.

* Keep windows and doors closed or cover with screens to prevent mosquitoes from entering your home.

"West Nile virus has been detected in all lower 48 states, and while we urge all Tennesseans to take steps to protect themselves against it, certain groups of people are more at risk for the most serious forms of illness the virus can cause," said State Medical Entomologist Abelardo Moncayo, PhD. "People with medical conditions such as cancer, diabetes, hypertension and kidney disease are at greater risk for serious illness from WNV."

The virus can cause severe infections, which could lead to meningitis or encephalitis and result in high fever, neck stiffness, stupor or disorientation. Severe cases may also cause muscle weakness or paralysis.

For more information on West Nile virus, visit the Tennessee Department of Health website at http://health.state.tn.us/ceds/WNV/wnvhome.asp.

Copyright 2014 WMC Action News 5. All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow

1414 North Memorial Parkway
Huntsville, AL 35801
256-533-4848

WAFF Is a Proud Member
of the Raycom Family of Stations


FCC Public File
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and WAFF. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.