Meteorologist Jeff Castle leaving WAFF for KSLA - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

WAFF meteorologist Jeff Castle promoted to Chief Meteorologist at KSLA

Meteorologist Jeff Castle is leaving WAFF to be the Chief Meteorologist at KSLA. Meteorologist Jeff Castle is leaving WAFF to be the Chief Meteorologist at KSLA.

After 12 years of waking up the Tennessee Valley and providing them with their all-important morning weather forecast, Jeff Castle is going to be promoted to Chief Meteorologist at KSLA-TV in Shreveport, Louisiana. KSLA-TV is owned by Raycom Broadcast Media, which also owns WAFF 48.

"This is an exciting opportunity for Jeff and although he will be greatly missed at WAFF, we are happy he is staying within the Raycom family," said WAFF 48 General Manager Vanessa Oubre.

Jeff Castle has been a friendly face on WAFF 48's morning news since 2002 when he moved to Huntsville from  KOCO-TV in Oklahoma City.

"I'm going to miss everyone here at WAFF 48," said Castle. "It has been a tremendous leaning experience. The people here at WAFF have mentored me for the new role I'm about to take on.  I want to thank the viewers who have welcomed me into their home and have trusted me with bringing them the weather information they need to start their day."

"Jeff's severe weather expertise and outstanding presentation skills have made him a highly sought after meteorologist," said News Director Adam Henning. "That he is able to take his skills to another Raycom station as Chief Meteorologist speaks volumes." 

Jeff's last day at WAFF 48 will be June 20. Please feel free to send your best wishes to Jeff via our WAFF 48 Facebook page.  

Copyright 2014 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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