Making a Difference: Woman has new look on life after heart - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Making a Difference: Woman has new look on life after heart attack

MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) -

Back from the dead, and happy to be alive! Jean Landingham has an extraordinary story to tell.

"I died and came back," Landingham said. "Seeing your loved ones in my face is pretty awesome."

Talk about being in the right place at the right time.

On May 22, Landingham's friend, Willis Cooley, had a doctor's appointment in the Baptist South Medical complex. As a kind gesture, Landingham gave Cooley a ride. Once in the waiting room, it happened.

"I saw she had dropped the phone and just collapsed," Cooley said. "I walked across the hall and told everybody this lady needs help! She's sick!"

Landingham had suffered a heart attack.

"The doctors told me I died," Landingham said. "The nurses told me I died."

Seven days later and cleared up artery along with two stents, Jean Landingham plans to 'thank' her doctors and nurses when she goes back for a pacemaker surgery on July 1. Landingham knows full well hugs and kisses can't possibly repay the debt of deep gratitude she is feeling today.

"The doctors and the nurses just took care of me," Landingham said. "It was marvelous."

For Landingham, this was a life-changing moment in more ways than one. She no longer takes everything for granted, no longer content to just live. Landingham has learned to embrace every second.

"I didn't know how to appreciate life, but now I want to do everything like ride a four-wheeler," Landingham said with a smile.

Landingham not only credits the medical staff but ultimately God, thankful for a second chance and a clearer focus on life.

Copyright 2014 WSFA 12 News. All rights reserved.

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