TVA plans to temporarily resume Lake Guntersville weed control - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

TVA plans to temporarily resume Lake Guntersville weed control

Officials hope to find a good balance for recreational water users and bass fishermen like Mike Cox. Officials hope to find a good balance for recreational water users and bass fishermen like Mike Cox.
GUNTERSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

The Tennessee Valley Authority will resume their aquatic weed control program for Lake Guntersville, at least on a temporary basis. Citing costs, the electricity provider ended the program in 2010.

To some community members, this is good news; others don't see it that way. But officials hope to find a good balance for recreational water users and bass fishermen.

The TVA announced Thursday they are committed to resuming the project for the short-term, for up to six years, in both residential and commercial-traffic areas, a common practice prior to 2010.

Officials said the plan is to allow a recently-created Alabama state board time to develop ways to find more local funds to keep the operation running. TVA plans to totally fund the project for three years, and then gradually decrease funding by one-third the remaining three years.

One bass fisherman said he knows there are two sides to the issue. "The recreational boaters will love it. I think the fishermen will hate it," said Mike Cox. "The grass hides forage. It's in the grass, it's protected, they grow large. There's mass quantities and it helps the fishing dramatically."

Local and state officials are expected to meet soon to work out plans for the program.

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