Graphic warnings on cigarette packs may cut smoking rates - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Graphic warnings on cigarette packs may cut smoking rates

Updated:
© iStockphoto.com / Stockphoto4u © iStockphoto.com / Stockphoto4u
  • HealthMore>>

  • FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    © FDA© FDA
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • 1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>
    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>

MONDAY, Dec. 2, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Pictures of diseased lungs and other types of graphic warning labels on cigarette packs could cut the number of smokers in the United States by as much as 8.6 million people and save millions of lives, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at the effect that graphic warning labels on cigarette packs had in Canada and concluded that they resulted in a 12 percent to 20 percent decrease in smokers between 2000 and 2009.

If the same model was applied to the United States, the introduction of graphic warning labels would reduce the number of smokers by between 5.3 million and 8.6 million smokers, according to the study from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project.

The project is an international research collaboration of more than 100 tobacco-control researchers and experts from 22 countries.

The researchers also said a model used in 2011 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to assess the effect of graphic warning labels significantly underestimated their impact.

These new findings indicate that the potential reduction in smoking rates is 33 to 53 times larger than that estimated in the FDA's model. They also prove the effectiveness of health warnings that include graphic pictures, according to the authors of the study, which was published online recently in the journal Tobacco Control.

"These findings are important for the ongoing initiative to introduce graphic warnings in the United States," study lead author Jidong Huang, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, said in a news release.

"The original proposal by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration was successfully challenged by the tobacco industry, and the court cited the very low estimated impact on smoking rates as a factor in its judgment," Huang said.

"Our analyses corrected for errors in the FDA's analysis, concluding that the effect of graphic warnings on smoking rates would be much stronger than the FDA found," Huang said. "Our results provide much stronger support for the FDA's revised proposal for graphic warnings, which we hope will be forthcoming in the near future."

More information

Learn more about the FDA's tobacco-labeling rules.

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow

1414 North Memorial Parkway
Huntsville, AL 35801
256-533-4848

WAFF Is a Proud Member
of the Raycom Family of Stations


FCC Public File
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and WAFF. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.