Dead newborn's mother admits to meth use before delivery - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Dead newborn's mother admits to meth use before delivery

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Cassie Davis is currently charged with chemical endangerment of a child and is being held in the Marshall County Jail on a $1 million bond. Cassie Davis is currently charged with chemical endangerment of a child and is being held in the Marshall County Jail on a $1 million bond.
BOAZ, AL (WAFF) -

A Boaz woman is in jail after her newborn baby died at home soon after birth. Police said the woman admitted to using meth just before delivering the child.

A couple at the mobile home park where the woman lived said she moved in on Friday, had a baby shower on Saturday, then delivered the baby on Sunday, with the death happening soon afterward.

Cassie Davis is currently charged with chemical endangerment of a child and is being held in the Marshall County Jail on a $1 million bond.

Boaz Police and fire personnel were called to the home in the Leisure Acres Mobile Home Park on Sunday after receiving a call of an unresponsive child.

Officials said they found the woman had just given birth to the child. Both Davis and the child were transported to the hospital, where the baby was pronounced dead.

Chief Scott Farish said the mother admitted to taking methamphetamine earlier that day. They are now investigating to see if the charges could be upgraded.

"Chemical endangerment of a child is upgraded if the child dies. It could be upgraded to a Class A felony if that happens," said Chief Farish.

The case remains under investigation. Results will be presented to a Marshall County grand jury.

A similar case, handed down in January, set a precedent for chemical endangerment charges filed for these types of infant deaths.

The ruling involved a case out of Colbert County. Amanda Kimbrough admitted to smoking meth just three days before going into labor. Kimbrough pleaded guilty, but then challenged the plea, stating unborn children did not have the same protection under the law.

The court ruled that unborn children are protected under the chemical endangerment law.

According to a recent study, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health found that among pregnant women aged 15-44, the youngest ones generally reported the greatest substance abuse.

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