Decatur family clears hurdles to bring adopted daughters home - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Decatur family clears hurdles to bring adopted daughters home

The newly completed Kyle family. The newly completed Kyle family.
HUNTSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

After years of fighting to adopt two orphan girls from the Dominican Republic, a Decatur family finally brought them home Saturday.

The Kyle family has fought long and hard to adopt these two girls. It was road block after road block for them. But this weekend, they turned their family of six into a family of eight.

After three long years of court battles and being told "no" by the Dominican government, the Kyle family is finally bringing home their two adopted daughters, Izzy and Jada.

"It's a joy that I can't put into words. It's overwhelming. We have been waiting for this day for three years and we are just so excited that it has finally come to pass," said mother Heather Kyle.

Dozens of family members were there to welcome them, as the girls set foot on U.S. soil for the first time at Huntsville International Airport.

"We have been praying for Jada and Izzy for a long time and just to see this adoption is an awesome blessing and relief and excitement," said family member Heather Adams.

The story of their adoption is actually nine years in the making. That's how long ago Heather and Tommy Kyle met the two newest members of their family.

"They grew up in an orphanage in the Dominican Republic with 160 girls. They have been there since they were babies," said Kyle.

The Kyles quickly fell in love with the girls and dedicated their life to making them a part of their family.

"They were told no from the government in the Dominican and that didn't stop them. They kept on, and they appealed, and they went to court. They fought for these girls, so today is a huge blessing just to bring them here," said Adams.

The adoption became official Friday.

Early Saturday, they boarded the next flight to Huntsville.

"When we were handed our papers, it was just as good as birthing my other three. It was the same joy and we just feel like our family is complete now," said Kyle.

A journey of prayer, passion, and persistence finally complete.

Both girls, who are sisters, said they are happy to be here and the family looks forward to a new life ahead.

Copyright 2013 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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