Local professor warns about U.S. inaction towards Syria - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Local professor warns about U.S. inaction towards Syria

Dr. Kathy Hawk warned about U.S. action, or lack thereof, against Syria. Dr. Kathy Hawk warned about U.S. action, or lack thereof, against Syria.
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HUNTSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

One Tennessee Valley expert said America's options in Syria look can go from bad to worse.

Kathy Hawk, director of the UAH Global Understanding Initiative, warned that there will be consequences for whatever the United States does or doesn't do in response.

Dr. Hawk said this violence threatens the stability of the Middle East, threatens the oil markets, threatens Israel and offers a hideous humanitarian crisis.

She said that taking action against the Assad regime sooner might have been better, before Syria's anti-government rebels came to be dominated by extremists connected to Al Qaeda terrorists. If the government really did use chemicals weapons, though, Dr. Hawk warned that this makes for a dangerous change outside of Syria too.

"Iran is certainly watching. And if taboo weapons are allowed to be used, what stops them from saying ‘Hmm, we're going to develop nuclear weapons. Maybe we'll only use tactical ones where not so many people are killed'" Dr. Hawk said. "It's a very slippery slope. The U.S. can't stay out of this. We're in this whether we like it or not."

Dr. Hawk said there's much concern that any U.S. action could bring reprisals, such as Syrian attacks on Israel or terrorist attacks elsewhere. But she said that might happen anyway, and more chemical weapons attacks are certainly more likely if the U.S. doesn't do something. At this point, she said not taking action is taking action, and that will have consequences anyway.

Copyright 2013 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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