Parents still wait for transfers as deadline nears - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Parents still wait for transfers as deadline nears

8 students whose transfers were approved fell under Accountability Act guidelines. 8 students whose transfers were approved fell under Accountability Act guidelines.
HUNTSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

Dozens of parents with students in Huntsville City Schools are still trying to take advantage of an Accountability Act stipulation that would allow them to transfer their children out of failing schools.

John Tribble believes he did everything right. He applied in February to transfer his son from Butler High School to Huntsville High School. Now with classes in their first week, "they haven't written a letter or given anything to me. All I'm getting is a runaround," said Tribble.

The reason for the transfer is simple, according to Tribble: "I don't want him to go to a failing school." However, things aren't as simple when you look at the numbers.

More than 500 parents applied for transfers this year. Only 295 were approved based on space available, and of those, eight fell under the Accountability Act for approval. Here's why: "We are still under a federal desegregation order, and federal law trumps state law," said School Spokesperson Keith Ward.

The order states that students in the minority cannot transfer to a school where they would be in the majority. That doesn't help Tribble's case. "The problem is the education I want my child to get and receive," said Tribble.

School leaders believe the real problem is state lawmakers who passed a law that was in essence an empty promise to parents. In the meantime, the district said they have pumped more resources into the nine Huntsville schools that were deemed "failing" under the Accountability Act. "We've got everything in place that can help their child, and we would like to see them take advantage of that," said Ward.

"I have to move just to get him out of the school," said Tribble. "This is not what I want to do, but I guess it's what I have to do."

By Friday, the school transfer process will be over for Huntsville City Schools.

Copyright 2013 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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