Theft trial date set for father of school shooter - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Theft trial date set for father of school shooter

MADISON COUNTY, AL (WAFF) -

The theft trial for Dr. Iqbal Memon, father of the Discovery School shooter Hammad Memon, is set for September.

Memon is charged with theft in Montgomery County.

Investigators with the State Attorney General's Office said he stole more than $7,000 from the Alabama Medicaid Agency.

Memon is a pediatrician who practices in Athens.

His trial is set to begin September 16th.

Memon also faces a hindering prosecution in Madison County.

He's accused of trying to help his son get out of the country to avoid trial. That trial is set for next week.

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