Jackson Co. considers new vicious dog ordinance - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Jackson Co. considers new vicious dog ordinance

New vicious dog ordinance is being considered by the Jackson County Commission. New vicious dog ordinance is being considered by the Jackson County Commission.
JACKSON COUNTY, AL (WAFF) -

The Jackson County Commission is hoping to pass a vicious dog ordinance which will give the county's animal control officer a greater ability to deal with problematic dogs.

Chairman Matthew Hodges said it's less restrictive than a proposal put forth by the previous commission.

According to Hodges, the ordinance focuses on being able to deal with people who are bit by dogs in the county. He also said the county needs a way to better protect the public when dogs go on the attack.

"There's not a lot we can do. There's not a lot a property owner can do without possible repercussion and this will give them that ability to do something," said Hodges.

The meeting will be held immediately after the commissions workshop meeting and is set for 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Dutton Town Hall.

Hodges said they will probably have a couple more public hearings in the next couple of months but those times and dates are not yet set.

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