Trees down, roads closed in Mansfield after possible tornado - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Trees down, roads closed in Mansfield after possible tornado

MANSFIELD, CT (WFSB) -

Residents in Mansfield will start to clear massive damage left in the wake of severe storms late Wednesday afternoon, and members of the National Weather Service will be in the area to tour the damage to see if a tornado did indeed touch down.

Massive trees are splintered and have been snapped like toothpicks, covering roads, driveways and landing on homes.

"It's going to be a while before we get power because lines are snapped right off the pole," witness Jeanette Loehr said.

In Mansfield, the storm tossed trees onto the road with enough force to damage the metal guardrails. A neighbor in Storrs caught the funnel cloud on camera, with black ominous clouds swirling around.

Wendy Halle said that as she was recording it, winds were whipping around her, but the trees were eerily still.

"It was calm," she said. "It was calm right here. The clouds were forming and swirling."

She said after recording the storm, she got into her basement to take cover, but no damage was reported at her home.

Copyright 2013 WFSB (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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