Huntsville murder suspect granted indigent status - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Huntsville murder suspect granted indigent status

Stephen Marc Stone (Source: Huntsville-Madison County Metro Jail) Stephen Marc Stone (Source: Huntsville-Madison County Metro Jail)
Police found Zachery and Krista Stone dead in their South Huntsville home. Police found Zachery and Krista Stone dead in their South Huntsville home.
Zachery and Krista Stone Zachery and Krista Stone
HUNTSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

A Madison County judge granted a request for indigent status for a Huntsville man accused of killing his wife and child.

Stephen Marc Stone is charged with 2 counts of capital murder. He's in the Metro Jail without bond.

Investigators say Stone strangled his wife Krista and strangled and drowned his 7-year-old son Zachary.

Police found their bodies in the family home on Chicamauga Trail in South Huntsville in February.

According to investigators, Stone drove to the Leeds Police Department after the murders and confessed.

Investigators have not released a motive in this case. 

Madison County District Attorney Rob Broussard filed documents informing the court he would prosecute this case personally with the help of Assistant District Attorney Tim Gann.

In Stone's application for indigency he stated he has no money in the bank, no land or house, and no source of income.

Stone also stated he has no debt or bills.

The application listed two daughters as dependents.

The judge appointed two attorneys, Brian Clark and Lonzo Robinson, to defend Stone.

Copyright 2013 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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