Franklin Co. draws up bill in reaction to Sandy Hook shootings - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Franklin Co. draws up bill in reaction to Sandy Hook shootings

The bill is local and cleared the state House without any opposition. The bill is local and cleared the state House without any opposition.
FRANKLIN COUNTY, AL (WAFF) -

A bill drawn up in reaction to the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School is one step closer to law.

This bill could arm educators, and even some bus drivers, in Franklin County.

The bill is local and cleared the state House without any opposition. It only affects schools in Franklin County, Alabama.

The bill sets up a volunteer emergency security force. They would be trained by the sheriff or a police chief to provide security for schools in Franklin County. They would be classified as a reserve deputy or a reserve police officer, and they could carry a weapon.

Lawmakers said the bill would help rural school districts such as Franklin County who cannot afford to hire a resource officer for every school.

"All we're doing is saying hey, during the school day we're gonna have those people armed there to take care of any situation that could occur that would be a potential harm to students," said Rep. Johnny Mack Morrow.

The bill will go to the state senate for consideration.

It will go into effect as soon as it passes and the governor signs it.

Copyright 2013 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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