Former LSU coach sues LSU and athletic officials - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Former LSU coach sues LSU and athletic officials

Tony Minnis (Source: lsusports.net) Tony Minnis (Source: lsusports.net)
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

Tony Minnis is the longest-serving and most successful coach in the history of Lady Tiger tennis. Minnis was named regional coach of the year five times and SEC coach of the year as well in his career.

The tennis coach lost his job this year after he says he let his feelings about the way he was being treated known in a letter to LSU athletic director Joe Alleva.

"Six weeks later after making the NCAA tournament for the 15th time, I was fired and never given a reason, Minnis said.

Tony Minnis filed a lawsuit against LSU and its athletic officials in 19th Judicial District Court Tuesday.

Minnis says university athletic officials first started to discriminate against him when he openly complained about the sub-par tennis facilities at LSU especially when compared to other SEC facilities.

Minnis says LSU athletic officials also gave him unjust evaluations and kept his pay lower than other tennis coaches around the country.

"I confronted Mr. Aleeva about it and tried to get an explanation," Minnis said. "It made absolutely no sense in light of the fact that I had just seen him on a TV interview basically acknowledging that we had very poor facilities and how tough it was to recruit and compete. At the same time he stuck by the evaluation of ‘needs improvement for a Top 25 finish'," Minnis recalled.

In response to the lawsuit, LSU officials released a statement.

"It is not our practice to comment on litigation," said university spokesman Herb Vincent. "We deny the allegations of the lawsuit."

Minnis says he would like to restore his name.

"I grew up here in Baton Rouge- I love LSU," Minnis said.

"I love purple and gold and I will until the day I die but at the same time I think it got to a point it was so blatant."

Copyright 2012 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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