Congressman pushing for action on illegal immigration - WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Congressman pushing for action on illegal immigration

By Eric Sollman
WAFF 48 News Reporter

 

There are lots of bills, acts, and resolutions out there promoting an answer to the ever-growing illegal immigration problem. There isn't legislation that's actually made it to law. 

WAFF 48 Investigator Eric Sollman has the story.

Just last week, an Alabama Senate Committee couldn't come up with enough members for a vote on the issue.

As we near the end of the legislative session, we asked people what they would like to see politicians do about illegal immigration.  

"Get up off their hind ends and do something, because they're coming in and taking all our jobs from us and we can't work," says Bryan Millsaps.  

"Find some solution that's agreeable to everyone, it doesn't have to be harsh, and it doesn't have to be lenient, it can be sensible," says Ann Bishop.  

"Number one, do research and find out what are the pro's and cons," says Alfred Hill.  

"I came the right way, so that's the way it was," says Brenda Thornton.

Congressman Robert Aderholt is pushing a discharge petition for The Secure America with Verification and Enforcement, or SAVE Act.

The act calls for common sense measures for immigration reform such as improving border security, enhancing employer verification, and stepping up interior enforcement.

The discharge petition would get the bill out of committee and force members of congress to either vote yes or no.

Congressman Aderholt needs 218 signatures for the petition, but he only has 181 right now.

In Alabama, Representative Randy Hinshaw says he'll see to it that a series of bills addressing the problem at the state level will see action.  

"It's going to be my priority to get this on the calendar, and I've got the support of the speaker of the house, so we're going to get this issue up and voted on in the house," says Hinshaw.  

Hinshaw adds that the timing of these immigration bills is critical as other pieces of legislation and budget negotiations come up in the next few weeks.

You can contact Eric Sollman via email at esollman@waff.com

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