‘Batkid’ is cancer free 5 years after ‘saving San Francisco’

‘Batkid’ is cancer free 5 years after ‘saving San Francisco’
Miles Scott, dressed as Batkid, right, walks with Batman before saving a damsel in distress in San Francisco, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (Associated Press/Jeff Chiu)

SAN FRANCISCO (RNN) - It was an unforgettable event, all to help lift a boy’s spirits.

Five years ago, as part of 5-year-old Miles Scott’s wish, he became Batkid for a day - even fighting crime just like a superhero, thanks to Make-A-Wish Greater Bay Area.

Make-A-Wish makes wishes come true for children with critical illnesses.

Now five years later, Miles is a healthy 10-year-old, with no sign of cancer.

The boy, who was suffering from leukemia, got his wish five years ago to become a junior version of Batman and was accompanied by Batman himself in doing good deeds across the city of San Francisco.

The late San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, the San Francisco Police and Fire departments and the San Francisco Giants all helped the young “Batkid” in his quest to become a superhero for a day, the Make-A-Wish Foundation said.

Miles Scott, 5, dressed as Batkid, waits in a Lamborghini "Batmobile" as he and Batman get ready to stop a bank robbery in San Francisco, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (Associated Press/Gary Reyes)
Miles Scott, 5, dressed as Batkid, waits in a Lamborghini "Batmobile" as he and Batman get ready to stop a bank robbery in San Francisco, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (Associated Press/Gary Reyes)

As “Batkid” Miles battled criminals such as The Riddler, freed Giants’ mascot Lou Seal and earned a key to the city from Lee.

People across the nation also took notice as the city cheered on “Batkid.”

“That day, all of you were heroes to us. You were part of his wish and each of you who were there or who followed it online or through the media got to experience the magical power of a wish come true,” the foundation said.

Five years ago, another wish came true for young Miles as well: the end of three years of cancer treatment. He was initially diagnosed with leukemia at 18 months old.

Since the end of his treatment, he’s been in remission, having to visit an oncologist once a year.

The “Batkid" experience was chronicled in a 2015 documentary: “Batkid Begins.”

“Batkid” has since “returned to being a typical kid - playing little league, going to school, helping his family farm, and even selling his first market goat in the local fair,” the Make-a-Wish Foundation reported.

Daniel Fry holds up his daughter Kayla, 5, as they wait for Miles Scott, dressed as Batkid, in San Francisco, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (Associated Press/Jeff Chiu)
Daniel Fry holds up his daughter Kayla, 5, as they wait for Miles Scott, dressed as Batkid, in San Francisco, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (Associated Press/Jeff Chiu)

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